Northern Mystery Co.
A few of the bone folders that I have made to date. The longest one is 7 inches long. The narrow one the far left is deer, and is very thin, tapering down to about 1mm at the tip. I use this one mostly for conservation work, for lifting leaves of paper in much the same manner as a micro-spatula. In the left-center, also deer, is the one I use most, a lovely tool for folding. I really love the mottled look that deer bone can have. The large white one is the first bone folder that I ever made, in the summer of 2007 with Denise Carbone at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, PA. It is elk (from Jim Croft) and is used mostly for heavier work such as folding large or heavy sheets of paper, or book signatures. The bottom side is nice and flat along a pretty decent curve, so I end up using it for flattening. The odd one on the far-right is moose bone. I don’t really have a specific use for it yet; some reshaping may take place. It is pretty true to what the original bone looked like, but with some smoothing of the edges and surface. I left the ball-like end intact because I am quite fond of the way it looks. The place that I got if from listed it as an ankle bone, but Jim Croft told me recently that it is found in the knee of mature animals, and that they don’t turn up very often. He also said that he may have some from mature deer, but they are much tinier. My boss has one of the deer ones and loves it for delicate work. I am hoping to get my hands on one, and will post a photo once I do.

A few of the bone folders that I have made to date. The longest one is 7 inches long. The narrow one the far left is deer, and is very thin, tapering down to about 1mm at the tip. I use this one mostly for conservation work, for lifting leaves of paper in much the same manner as a micro-spatula. In the left-center, also deer, is the one I use most, a lovely tool for folding. I really love the mottled look that deer bone can have. The large white one is the first bone folder that I ever made, in the summer of 2007 with Denise Carbone at the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia, PA. It is elk (from Jim Croft) and is used mostly for heavier work such as folding large or heavy sheets of paper, or book signatures. The bottom side is nice and flat along a pretty decent curve, so I end up using it for flattening. The odd one on the far-right is moose bone. I don’t really have a specific use for it yet; some reshaping may take place. It is pretty true to what the original bone looked like, but with some smoothing of the edges and surface. I left the ball-like end intact because I am quite fond of the way it looks. The place that I got if from listed it as an ankle bone, but Jim Croft told me recently that it is found in the knee of mature animals, and that they don’t turn up very often. He also said that he may have some from mature deer, but they are much tinier. My boss has one of the deer ones and loves it for delicate work. I am hoping to get my hands on one, and will post a photo once I do.